A Couple of Recent Wine Enthusiast Pieces

The world of wine storage can get pretty confusing…part of my job is to help wine lovers figure out the best method of storage for their individual needs. Much has to with what is in their actual collection, the bottle capacity and of course budget. But there is certainly much more to it than that. Below are a couple of recent articles I worked on that can help distinguish if a single or dual zone wine refrigerator is best for you, and some pretty stunning cellars that we created over the years. Check it out!

The 411 On Dual Zone Wine Fridges

Cellar With Style

Some Fall Wines To Help Get Over the Summertime Blues

Get over it people…summer’s over. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s time that someone said it out loud. Sure, I’d love to still be kicking up the sand and body surfing the waves, grilling all day long while knocking back some summer brews and crisp, mouthwatering whites like everyone else. But it’s time to face facts, fall is coming and there is nothing we can do about it. Well, almost nothing.

What we can do is start switching gears from all those light and refreshing beverages to some with a little more body, spice and flavor. When it comes to beer, I don’t need to tell you what is on the horizon…can you say, Pumpkin?!?! But for wine, there is a myriad of red and white selections that can make the transition from the dog days of summer into the cool autumn nights and those breezy, foliage filled days a little more palatable.


While Pinot Grigio and Sauvi Blanc kept you cool and refreshed over the summer, Chardonnay makes for the ideal fall white. With so many different styles ranging from the clean, lean and green apple driven unoaked version to the smoky, oaky and buttery bombs, it can be enjoyed during those warm fall afternoons or those chilly evenings. Having recently visited the Finger Lakes, my two favorite Chards right now both hail from Fox Run Vineyards where they are producing some serious whites. The unaoked Doyle Family Vineyard Chardonnay as well as the noticeably oaked Reserve Kaiser Vineyard Chard are both impeccable for the season and super reasonable under $15 for either option.


No, not the pink stuff… REAL Zinfandel. There is something about all that blackberry and blueberry pie, brambly fruit and peppery spice that just screams fall to me. Whether opening a bottle for those late season grill sessions, or just enjoying a glass in front of the fire pit, Zin and fall truly make a perfect pairing. Rosenblum’s entire line of Zinfandel is pretty stellar, but for me the Rockpile Vineyard for around $25-30 a bottle is a clear standout. And for about $20-25 you can grab the Decoy Zinfandel (entry line of Duckhorn) which is a true value as it exhibits much of the same flavor profile as the higher end Paraduxx Zin that is twice the price.

2012 Decoy Sonoma County Zinfandel

Northern Rhone

Most people seem to be more familiar with the Southern Rhone (AOCs such as Cotes du Rhones and Chateuneuf Du Pape) Grenache based wines than the Northern Rhone which is a little more elusive and dare I say…mystical? These Syrah based wines (some with a dash of Viogner, yes a white wine, added into the blends) are known to be quite complex yet elegant and typically carry aromas and flavors of black fruit, kirsch, pepper, earth, floral notes and even bacon fat. These hearty and silky wines are just what the doctor ordered to help keep warm and cozy on those crisp autumn evenings.

Certain AOCs such as Cote Rotie and Hermitage are home to some of the most famous vineyards in the world and produce some outrageously delicious, ageable and expensive wines. Yet, there are less elite appellations such as Crozes Hermitage, Cornas and St. Joseph that intrinsically carry similar styles and characteristics at a much more affordable price point. Some top notch producers to keep an eye out for are E. Guigal, M. Chapoutier, Tardieu Laurent, Delas Freres and Saint Cosme.

E-Guigal-Cote-Rotie-Brune-Blonde-2010        wine bottle label       


This may not be an everyday fall kind of wine, but if the right occasion arises a little Port can go a long way. Fortified wines are like getting the best of both worlds, since they are typically a combination of some form of spirit and wine. In producing Port, brandy is added to the juice during fermentation in order to halt the process leaving much of the residual sugar in the finished product… pure genius! Originally it was done so the wine could travel without spoiling, but ever since the chaps over in England were taken with this new style of wine it has become a dessert wine staple. So when you are sitting out in front of the fire on those lovely fall nights making S’mores with the kiddies, the chocolate, dark plum and berry flavors of most Ruby style Ports, particular a Taylor’s Late Bottled Vintage Porto, make for a decadent accompaniment.


So instead of dreading the fading of those summer days, it is time to revel in the emergence of my favorite season of the year. Enough with all of that lounging around, enjoying the pool and beach and golf and… I mean who am I kidding, of course it sucks. But enjoying some of these fall friendly selections will at least soften the blow.


5 Tips To Avoid Opening That Gifted Bottle Of Swill

We’ve all been there…. You’re hosting a small gathering at your pad and since your friends know how much you enjoy your vino, they figure ‘What better gift to bring over than a bottle of wine?!’ Unfortunately, some people’s taste in wine may greatly differ from yours, or the bottle they choose to bring just may not fit in with what you had planned to serve that evening. Or maybe that bottle is a surprisingly good one, but just not ready to drink. Or…you may  have some friends that are just friggin’ cheap.

So there you are with a bottle in hand that you are trying to get out of opening, but of course you don’t want to be a complete jackass and hurt anyone’s feelings either. This can be a sticky situation as people can be a little sensitive about wanting to taste the wine that they bring (however, technically it is acceptable etiquette to choose not to serve that gifted bottle). So how do you avoid having to open that potential ‘swill’ without coming off like a total wine snob while using a legitimate excuse? Check it out…

Feel The Heat – Most times people will stop off at a wine shop to pick up a bottle to bring. If so, there are very few stores that keep their wines at a cool enough temperature to serve right away, even reds. So if you have a white in the fridge, or a red from your wine cellar, at the perfect serving temperature… that is an easy out to open up something a bit more readily enjoyable.

Youth Gone Wild – Not many folks will bring quality older vintage wines over… and if they do then you should ignore this post and open anything they bring! More often the most recent vintages are what ends up coming through your door. So if you offer to open up a selection that has a bit more age and is ready to drink, your guests should be more than happy to forego their gifted bottle.

How About An Upgrade?– When family and friends come over that are known to enjoy some quality juice, I have no problem breaking out the big guns. So if someone brings over an average bottle of Napa Cab for example, I like to offer something slightly higher up on the food chain and preferably with some bottle age (most recently I cracked open a 2005 Far Niente Cab as an upgrade…sick juice!). Again, if the parties involved enjoy and appreciate wine as you do they will most likely be more than happy to oblige.

The Missing Swill – I’m not saying that I’ve done this… but sometimes in the confusion of a party things can go missing or end up misplaced. So if that $5 bottle of cheap-ass Chianti accidentally ends up in the bread basket or the dog’s crate, that may not be the worst tactic to avoid suffering through some brutal juice that can cause a lot of pain both going down as well as the next morning.

I De-cant Drink This –  If all else fails, the easiest route is just to open up the bottle and set it to the side to aerate a bit or possibly even throw it in a decanter. If it is a half way decent wine it just may improve, but in the meantime it allows you a chance to open some of your own juice. And let’s be honest, after a few choice bottles it probably won’t matter much what you’re drinking anyway ;)


Decanting Wine In A Blender… Really?!?

A couple of weeks ago my cousin told me about an article he read describing this whole decanting wine in a blender craze, and if I thought that it would actually work. I have seen a few different pieces on this ‘hyperdecanting’ fad where you can use handheld devices, or even blenders, to aerate a wine in a matter of seconds. It stems from the same premise as many of the aerators out there which expose wine to as much air as possible allowing them to open up in a flash.

So will putting wine in a blender work? Yeah…If you pour a bottle of wine into a blender that could use a good amount of aeration and hit the switch it probably will do the job. But is it worth it? Do you really want to take something as beautiful and delicate as a bottle of wine and toss it in the same device in which you make your smoothies and protein shakes? I know I don’t… here’s why.

First off, there’s certainly a chance it may damage the wine and minimally will give it some form of a froth. But more importantly, wine is a living and breathing thing…constantly evolving from the day it is made until the time it is consumed. It will also most likely gracefully improve as the wine sits in your glass. Personally, I love to experience how a wine changes in a matter of minutes from something tightly wound up and guarded to a fully expressive and complex treat for all the senses. By allowing it to whip around a blender like a kid on the Rotor,  you could miss one of the best transitional moments in the life of that wine thereby negating the overall enjoyment.

Wine Decanting

So I would say this… open a bottle, pour a little in a glass and give it a good sniff to take in all those delightful aromas. Then take a sip, swirl it around your mouth and let it linger on your palate before letting it go down. If it feels like there should be a little more to the wine then grab an aerator or decanter to help it open up a bit quicker. But if you have the time to wait, just pour yourself a glass and slowly enjoy it over time and you will notice how a really well made wine will slowly transform and mature to its fullest potential. As for the blender… probably best to leave that for the morning to make your favorite homemade hangover concoction.


What to pair with your Easter Dinner


Wow… a blast from the past! I posted this for Easter 5 years ago… and while some of the actual wines may no longer be available, the pairings still hold true. Take a look if you are in need of some Easter Wine Pairing help… Cheers!

Originally posted on Westchester Wine Guy:

As Good Friday has arrived, it’s time to start thinking about a lot of things for Easter Weekend….. where to hide the Easter eggs, which masses to hit (preferably the ones that aren’t like 3 hours) and what wines to buy that will complement the Easter feast you have planned. Not to fear…WWG has a few easy recommendations to help make your meal a hit! I should mention that even though I am Westchester based, I am always happy to have new followers that live in other areas too (yes, even out in Massapequa, LI… you know who you are!)

The two most popular meats that people cook on Easter are ham and lamb. So let’s start with a ham pairing. As far as meats go, ham is a little light and usually has some form of a sweet glaze on it. Even though I almost always prefer a red…

View original 611 more words

Storing and Serving with Wine Enthusiast

Just thought I would share a couple of pieces I co-wrote along with some of the talented writers here at Wine Enthusiast. Some great information on how to decipher if you need a wine cellar/refrigerator, as well as what kind may be right for you, and how to serve all your wines like a pro!

Do You Need A Cellar?

Your Cheat Sheet To Serving Wine

Break out the Bubbles! Top 5 Options for New Year’s Eve

As unfathomable as it may seem, this year is already over! The Christmas season just flew by and now the pre-New Year’s Eve jitters set in. You know that last minute frenzy leading up to New Year’s Eve… Should we go out or stay in? Will it be too crowded? Who is going to drive? What should we drink? While I can’t help you with the driving that night, I can lend a hand in selecting some tasty Sparkling selections for your festivities. Below are my 5 Favorite Bubbly options from $15-50.

Wallpaper holiday, new year, wine glasses, a bottle of champagne, 2014, bokeh

La Marca Prosecco – For around $15 I don’t think it gets much better than this Italian sparkler. Dry and zesty, the sweet honeysuckle notes enhance the core fruit of apple and peach while the crisp acidity runs straight through to the finish.

Domaine Carneros 2009 Ultra Brut – This Taittinger owned winery makes some of the best sparkling juice in all of Cali, and at $25 this is easily their greatest value. Aromas of lime zest, lemongrass and lovely floral notes lead to a dry and complex palate of apple, marzipan and almost flinty minerality.

Sparkling Pointe Brut – Keep it local and drink some tasty Long Island sparkling this New Year’s! Delicate, yet not simple, on the palate with lemon citrus and green apple fruit. Those classic yeasty and biscuit flavors find their way towards the finish leaving you looking for your next sip. Not a steal at $30, but Long Island real estate ain’t cheap.

Charles de Monrency Brut Reserve – A ‘grower’ Champagne that has all the quintessential qualities of top vintage offerings that are twice the price. Fine and lengthy bubbles lead to nutty, honied and toasty aromas and flavors. The biscuit and melon notes on the finish hang around long after the juice is gone. A lucious, mouthfilling mousse on this one as well.

Piper-Heidsieck Cuvée Brut – Without question my favorite Champagne for around $40+. It has that dry and crisp minerality that balances harmoniously with the citrus, green apple and subtly yeasty notes. For my palate this is as good as it gets under $50.

Whatever you choose to sip on this New Year’s Eve be sure to enjoy with family and friends, as that is sure to enhance any Sparkling experience.

Have a Happy and Healthy Y’all, catch ya in 2015!